Lindsey Whalen's jersey number 13 was retired by the Minnesota Lynx at 
a special ceremony in June. The four-time WNBA champion and six-time WNBA all-star player also won two Olympic gold medals. Whalen, who grew up in Hutchinson, now coaches the Gophers women’s basketball team. 

PHOTO NBAE/GETTY IMAGES
Lindsey Whalen's jersey number 13 was retired by the Minnesota Lynx at a special ceremony in June. The four-time WNBA champion and six-time WNBA all-star player also won two Olympic gold medals. Whalen, who grew up in Hutchinson, now coaches the Gophers women’s basketball team. PHOTO NBAE/GETTY IMAGES

Why Incarcerated Parents Are Losing Their Children

Since 2006, at least 32,000 incarcerated parents had their children permanently taken from them, even though they were not accused of physical or sexual abuse. Of those, nearly 5,000 appear to have lost their parental rights because of their imprisonment alone.

Dorothy Roberts, an expert on race, gender and family law at the University of Pennsylvania, said the underlying problem in the child-welfare system is decision-makers’ bias against poor parents, especially incarcerated mothers of color. The just thing to do as a society, she said, would be to better support these families with affordable housing, food assistance, drug treatment, and childcare, including in prisons.

“Instead of actually responding to the struggles of poor families, we’ve decided that it’s simpler to take their children away,” she said.

Between 2006 and 2016, tens of thousands of children were placed into foster care solely because a parent was incarcerated. Today, more than half of the 2.2 million people in the nation’s prisons and jails are parents of minor children.

Source: Marshallproject.org


Transforming Garbage

• In New York City, where 200 million pounds of clothing are trashed each year, a social media campaign is reminding residents and fashion designers to drop their old clothing at one of 1,000 locations throughout the city. This is in response to the estimate that only 14.2 percent of clothes and shoes were recycled in 2015 because people didn’t know about the locations.

• Recyclops uses an Uber-like model to collect recycling from rural areas where it isn’t economically feasible to invest in trucks and bins for such small population density. An estimated 34 million rural homes and 16 million apartments — around 40 percent of households in the country — don’t have access to recycling.

• Biocellection has created a chemical recycling process to turn polyethylene film — plastic bags, bubble wrap, shrink wrap — into higher-value chemical materials that can be made into other products, such as nylon and paint. EPA estimates that people in the U.S. use 380 billion plastic bags and wraps each year.

• IKEA is beginning to reinvent itself as a circular company by changing its designs. Several corporations are working on making packaging that is reusable, recyclable, or compostable, by 2025.

Source: Fast Company